Price Watch

Monthly Price Watch and Annex, December 2013

December 2013

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • In West Africa, the availability of recent harvests improved market supplies of maize, millet, and sorghum in November. Staple food prices remain at or below their respective five-year average levels in the surplus-producing areas of Mali and Burkina Faso, while prices are above-average in Nigeria, Niger, and in parts of Chad. Recent sorghum harvests and stable rice imports from international markets contributed to food availability in Senegal and Mauritania.

  • In East Africa, sorghum prices decreased across most markets in Somalia, Ethiopia and South Sudan due to the availability of improved market supplies from recent and ongoing harvests. Maize prices in Ethiopia and Somalia followed similar trends. Sorghum and millet prices continued to increase atypically across most of Sudan due to expectations of below-average harvests. Maize prices in Kenya, Rwanda, and Uganda continued to increase during the pre-harvest period. Wholesale maize prices decreased atypically in Tanzania with the availability of increased supply from above-average harvests in the southern highlands.

  • In Southern Africa, maize prices were stable or increased steadily as the lean season set in. Prices remained above their respective 2012 and five-year average levels due to tight regional supplies resulting from localized production shortfalls coupled with strong export and institutional demand. Maize grain and meal prices continued to increase atypically in parts of Zambia and Malawi. Maize spot prices on the South Africa Futures Exchange (SAFEX) increased steadily in November in response to persistent drought conditions in the productive North West province.

  • In Haiti, local black bean and maize prices were stable or decreased due to improved food availability from recent harvests. In Central America, bean prices declined due to the availability of stocks from above-average production in 2012 and 2013; maize prices decreased following an above-average Primera harvest. Rice prices were stable.

  • In Afghanistan and Tajikistan, wheat flour prices were stable due to recently concluded above-average harvests and the availability of lower-priced imports from Kazakhstan.

  • International rice prices remained stable or decreased. Maize prices decreased further with improved global harvest prospects. Wheat prices were stable or increased due to concerns over production in South America and Black Sea states. Crude oil prices were stable.

About Price Watch

Price Watch offers a monthly summary and outlook on global, regional and national trends of key commodity prices in FEWS NET countries. Analysis may touch on global issues, such as fuel prices or exchange rates, if they are likely to influence staple food prices in FEWS NET countries. The accompanying Price Watch Annex details price trends by country.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 28 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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