Key Message Update

Renewed violence restricts household access to food sources in Vakaga

September 2019

September 2019

October 2019 - January 2020

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC v3.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • The last two months have seen renewed violence between armed groups in Obo in Haut-Mbomou, Kaga-Bandoro in Nana-Gribizi, Bakouma in Mbomou, Zangba and Mingala in Basse-Kotto, and Birao in Vakaga. This has disrupted livelihood activities in these areas and poor households face difficulty accessing food sources. In Birao, the violence resulted in 38 deaths and displaced more than 19,000 people. Many households in Birao are unable to access their fields before the main millet and sorghum harvest, and their ability to access wild foods and hunt is also limited. Due to the hostilities, the border between Sudan and Vakaga and Upper Kotto prefectures was closed in September, which will likely affect trade in food and non-food commodities. As a result, food insecurity has intensified in conflict-affected areas that are already experiencing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse outcomes.

  • Although national harvests are still expected to be above the recent five-year average, rainfall deficits in western CAR have resulted in low first season harvests. However, second season production has benefited from favorable rainfall. In general, food supplies from October to March are expected to be better than last year in central and western prefectures. However, as mentioned above, some households may be unable to access and consume their crops in eastern prefectures that have been affected by the conflict. The increase in the national food supply has already led to a decline in market prices compared to September 2018. In Bambari markets, for example, the potato price has fallen by 40 percent in September compared to the previous year.

  • Despite increased food availability and access in most prefectures, food prices remain high in the East due to conflict, poor road access during the rainy season, and disruptions to harvesting activities. In the Obo market in Mbomou, the price of cassava was six times more than the prevailing price in western markets in September. High food prices, reduced access to crops and livelihood activities, and erratic access to food assistance continue to drive Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse outcomes. In July and August, food assistance reached only about 10 percent of the population in the Mbomou and Haut-Mbomou prefectures; data are not available for other prefectures.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 28 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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