Key Message Update

Atypical coping strategies employed along the riverine regions of Gao, Timbuktu, and the Niger Delta

July 2017

July - September 2017

Mali July 2017 Food Security Projections for July to September

October 2017 - January 2018

Mali July 2017 Food Security Projections for October to January

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • The current agricultural season is considered to be average throughout the country, despite inadequacy and poor distribution of rainfall in some agricultural areas in the south of the country. However, floods due to heavy rain have caused damage to households and livestock in Menaka, Gourma Rharous, Goundam, Kayes and Koulikoro, which weakens the livelihoods of the affected households.

  • Market supplies of cereals during this lean season remain average overall and are improving with harvests of off-season rice, green corn, and pulses. Stable or declining food prices are favorable for average household access to markets, except in the regions of Gao and Timbuktu where price increases of 5 to 25 percent reduce access. 

  • Improved livestock conditions due to the June-July rains ended the long and difficult pastoral lean season (February – June) in the north of the country and beginning of animal production (milk, butter, cheese). The improvement of body conditions and the resumptions of milk production are conducive to improved income and nutrition for pastoralists facing Stressed (IPC Phase 2) levels of food insecurity. 

  • Poor households in the rice-producing areas of Gao, Timbuktu, the Niger Delta and the western Sahel, who are currently borrowing, reducing non-food expenditures, and purchasing the cheapest available foods, are facing Stressed (IPC Phase 2) levels of food insecurity. The ongoing humanitarian food and non-food aid will improve access to food from now until September, which will be the end of the lean season. 

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 28 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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