Key Message Update

Food security conditions are favorable except in insecure areas

October 2018

October 2018 - January 2019

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • Ongoing millet, sorghum and maize harvests are forecast to be moderate to good. The availability of food from these crops is good and ensures the satisfaction of household food needs and the supply of grain markets. Income from the sale of cash crops provides income to help cover household costs. Market prices are seeing a seasonal downward trend owing to local and commercial supply, which are increasing with new harvests.

  • However, with the combined effects of delayed planting, floods, and crop pests, millet, sorghum, maize and cowpea and peanut production will be decreasing in some agricultural and agropastoral areas, such as in Tillaberi and the west of Tahoua, where households will not have the typical duration of stocks for their own consumption. Food insecurity, which is generally Minimal (IPC Phase 1) in October 2018, will change in early 2019 to Stressed (IPC Phase 2) for poor households in livelihood zones affected by these climate shocks.

  • Conditions are also generally favorable in pastoral areas where terms of trade for livestock/cereals are favorable for sufficient household food access. However, the late start of the pastoral season has not yet allowed pasture to complete its growing period, thus reducing the amount of biomass in some areas where supplies will not exceed 3 to 4 months for animal feed.

  • In the Diffa, Tillaberi and Tahoua regions, the effects of conflict result in the loss of livelihoods and limited humanitarian access to certain areas. Humanitarian assistance covers food needs of many households in accessible areas that remain Stressed (IPC Phase 2), but humanitarian actors are not able to reach hard-to-reach households in Diffa where Crisis (IPC Phase 3) will likely continue in the coming months.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 28 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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